Tag Archives: Painting

4xD: Paint it grey; The Monotone Monologue

13 Jun

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Now, there must be some of you out there thinking to yourselves that I seem to favour the colour grey quite a bit. Maybe it may be a subliminal reflection upon myself and my psyche, but there is method in my madness.

Sure, I have to admit that a great deal of my terrain work features the colour, but I think it is reflective of the world around us. Grey surrounds us in the form of natural rocks, the cloudy skies, the urban tarmac below our feet, and of course, the endless municipal 20th century buildings and dwellings we seem to have in the western world. As depressing as it sounds, grey is everywhere.

St Georges Minster Doncaster: One of my towns local landmarks. For as much as it’s beautiful architecture, it’s pretty darn grey!

Ok, so where is the colour? Why should this real life dredge apply so much to terrain building and my stuff primarily when I have all the colours in the world to deal with in these imaginary worlds that I can create?

The grey monotony of the stark and austere dungeon terrain is broken by the colour of the individual figures and models.

As much as I like garish and bright colours, I believe that terrain should not just look pretty on the table, but should reflect the world imagined around them. More importantly, since I’m dealing with miniatures, as much as I want my terrain to shine, it’s them that are the primary accent of colour on the table, the battlefield and terrain are secondary. I feel that everything else should be muted, that way the focus is on the action and the models, and making sure that the figures are not lost in a blur of colour. Monochrome terrain helps the colourful figures pop and stand out from the scenics. Now I’m not saying that everything should be grey on the table, but my preference allows for highlights that draw the eye, not to bombard the eye with far too much busy colour that might not be needed unless it’s really called for, hence making the important figures and objectives the centre of attention.

Grey everywhere, yet the lone blue creature stands out from the scene.

Now this is just my own opinion, but I much prefer this to overtly busy and incorrectly used colour palettes. I would however like to know your thoughts. Do you think that I’m talking bull? or do you think there is some truth to this?

Whatever your opinions, let me know in the comments section and give your side!

Grim’s Dungeons of Doom: Adventures in expanded foam, part 3; Cavern features

4 Oct

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Back again with the next part of Grim’s Dungeons of Doom, and more adventures in expanding foam, and how you can craft some decent scenics with this little used material.

OK, for part three, we are going to deal with cavern features, mainly hazard pools and stalagmites. I’ve opted here to create pieces that illustrate both at once, but there’s no reason you couldn’t do them independently if you wanted.

As ever, you’ll need your trusty expanding foam gap filler, some textured wallpaper, a few wooden sticks (skewers or toothpicks will do, use whatever you have) a sturdy base (MDF/Thick card/hardboard etc) and some sand for texture. Although you don’t need to go full throttle on the paint effects for the pools, you’ll need your usual acrylic paints, some inks, and some glass paint to achieve the finish on these.

A note on glass paints. Acrylic glass paint is a really useful paint type to have in your crafting arsenal. Think of it as a type of thick viscous ink or glaze. It dries glossy and clear, so you can achieve some decent effects with them. They mix down with water, ink, water based paints, so they are great to experiment with. I find them very hard to get hold of where I am (No decent craft shops anymore here) but they can be found on the web. My set currently I found at a cheap shop while on holiday, and since they were only £1, it was a great deal. Glass paints usually go for £2-£3 each so look out for them!

Right, first of all, get your textured wallpaper. The one I’m using is called Arundel I think, and it’s really great for simulating cobbles, bubbles and similar. I’ve used it before in the Walls tutorial, but its uses go way beyond just cladding stuff, here’s a look at the texture:

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This is what we’ll be using for the bubbling pools on the models. Next you’ll need to cut out a piece to stick on your base. make this any size you wish but leave some space around the edge to texturise your base and form the lip of the pool.

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When its stuck down, get out the foam filler and carefully lay down the filler around the pool,making sure you only go around the outside, leaving the textured paper alone.

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Next, spread the foam around and start to manipulate it with a wooden stick and spread it around to form interest and detail as we did before in part 1 and part 2. As you start to work it, you’ll notice that your stick will start to get bunged up with the drying foam, you’ll need this if you want to add stalagmites, so get them gunked up as you work the foam, gently adding more as you need it. As the foam dries, you’ll be able to shape it with your fingers, so shape the foam covered sticks into a rough point at one end, these will form the tips of the stalagmites. Make as many as you like of all sizes.

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As the foam dries, you can also cut sticks to size and position them into the piece. These sticks are then covered by adding more foam and covering them by the manipulation method. make sure you keep them upright as the foam dries otherwise they will set at odd angles.

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Separate foam stalagmites can be inserted into the piece easily by leaving a small peg on the foam covered wood and making a small hole in the foam. Glue them in using strong glue of your choosing.

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Add some texture by flocking with course sand or simliar, this will break up any smooth areas and create a more natural impression to the piece.

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After this, undercoat it black and start your cavern paint scheme on the foam areas only. Leave the pool, just paint the rest of the piece to match your other cavern terrain.

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Once you have done the basics on the foam areas, give the pool a good solid coat of bright yellow. For good coverage, you may want to do this 2 or 3 times to build up a good solid block colour as the base of the lava.

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Once it’s dried, start drybrushing over it with bright orange up to bright red as the base of the lava. Lightly drybrush the area around the edge too, this will give an eventual glow effect. Once they have dried, give the area a light drybrush of black as well, before moving onto the next step.

The effect here was achieved by firstly giving the lava pool a thick yellow wash to get the area wet enough for the glass paints to flow realistically through the channels of the texture detail. Use the combination of the thick viscous glass paints and acrylics to build up the appearance of runny lava flow, go yellow, then red, yellow, red until the layers look to your desired effect. Also take a toothpick and try and drag them into each other while drying to add even more detail. Keep adding layers until your satisfied. You may need to build up 5 or 6+ before you get the effect here. When totally dry, retouch the burnt black exposed areas, then seal in with a nice clear gloss.

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The green ooze effect is exactly the same technique, only using a combination of greens and yellows in ink, acrylic paint and green glass paint.

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There are lots of other results you can get from this technique, blood pools, sludge brown and so on, use your imagination!

It’s a great end look, that isn’t too hard to get, albeit a bit time consuming! It’s easier than one would think to get the effects, so give it a go!

So, I hope that this section of Dungeons of Doom has shown that Foam gap filler is indeed a great material to have in your craft supplies, and I’ll be featuring it in conjunction with other makes in the future. I know that there’s a few out there that have commented on how foam filler looks like what it is and that it could be a poor choice, but I disagree. Try experimenting with it to see what other uses it could fit, and you’ll be surprised if you think out of the box!

I’ll be back next time for more Dungeons of Doom…

Painting WIP: Two headed Troll Sculpt

11 Feb

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So, I’m getting through loads of stuff paintwise, that needs doing, and this has been put off for ages. This is of course, my own two headed troll sculpt thats been waiting for a long time. You’ll have to excuse the shadow on many of these pics due to the lack of natural light and my ability to adjust my camera exposure to the correct levels, but I’ve tried, just so I can give you a look at how he’s progressing (and keep me on track with all my progress)

Spurred on by recent old-skool Grenadier troll, its given me a proper kick up the arse to get his buddies done, and Fnar-frag has been next in line.

He’s a big feller this troll (You’ll see when hes done compared to the rest of his folks) but as a personality within them, I really wanted him to stand out. When I sculpted him, it was intended that he’d fulfill a leadership role of some kind within this section of trolls, yet I think I might make him an army standard instead. The reason being that of the odd pose with his hand. Originally I was going to make a goblin puppet on wires that the corresponding side had been playing with. Just is that I constantly kept changing my mind about it, so having tried a few options out previously, I think now he’s going to get an appropriate sized standard instead, as theres still a lot of work to do with the figure until I’m happy with it. Of course, I’ll pop up more WIP as I go on, but for now this is as far as I am (as of this afternoon)

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The scheme I chose was a genestealer-ish one that would match the grenadier one (not that it does really, but most of my trolls are from different places, so for me its not really a problem) The intention is to paint up each unit in the troll army with a different colour scheme (grey stone trolls coming soon, and some greenies as well, just that I’m sick of painting stuff green lately) Theres loads of highlighting left to do on his scaly back, plus outlining and other bits. Like I said this is not a small figure, so with an added standard, etc, theres loads of hours work for me left.

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I think he’s ok how its gone in both sculpting and painting up, but I think the next ones I do will come out better each time. I think I could get fine in making trolls, so much in fact if there were any takers, I’d do a whole lot of other trolls in a range, multipart that is, all with interchangable heads and weapons, then you’d get some nice variety and combos. They wouldn’t be as big, but just as mean and cartoony. Realistic they aint never going to be, as what is the point? I like it anyway!

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I’ll be back later with some painted bits from my 15mm space orc army and no doubt more drivel….

 

Troll Tribe: Old School Grenadier War Troll.

5 Feb

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I’ve been turning my hand back to painting up stuff from my lead pile of late, and thought it was about time to start up another unit. Since this old Fantasy Warriors Troll was already undercoated and pre prepared, I thought I might as well get around to it. My trolls are a mixed bunch, but I sort of like the random mix of styles they are made up from. I think he’s missing a shield, but don’t think he needs one to be honest, since none of my others have them either.

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This time I’ve opted for a purple skin tone, pale tones not heavy deep purples, topped with a mop of green scraggly hair. Sort of like “The Joker” colours I thought after they had gone on, but at least this next unit will contrast with my other lot (they are quite bright blue) and since I have a set of what I think will have to be stone trolls in grey, the tones in this unit will match up in similar shades.

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You’ll also notice that these lot are going to have tattoos, something the others don’t (but my giant does) so again, there will be a tie into the rest. of course I’ve got my own sculpt two headed troll leader to go with him next, and two quite nice forest trolls from CP models. I even have a smaller metal two headed troll to act as the leaders son, but when I got it, it really was subpar compared to the rest, and a little too small to fit, but I might end up adapting him somewhat before he gets into the tribe! My son has a nice big plastic D&D troll out of the drizzt boardgame, so I might have to make him an offer and add it to my boyos. I had this idea a long time ago to create two sides to fight in a giant wars type setting for a game, one side trolls, the other giants, so that’s where I’m heading with this. (just have one giant so far..)

Next troll up will be the ettin leader, which I just need to add a weapon, not sure what exactly, but I think I have a big sword in my spares box that’ll fit.

Back later with more painted bits….

Wargames Supply Dump get set to release the Draxxon!

31 Jan

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So I’m here briefly to talk about the Draxxion sculpts I sold on a while ago to Roger at Wargames Supply Dump. I’ve not had much time for the net lately, trying rather to get back on track with stuff, mostly painting and planning designs and such. Roger kindly sent me some finished castings of them to paint up, which I finally got around to (also, you read rogers blog post about them here)

If you are a regular here, you might remember the greens I made, they were ok, but as much of my stuff, they were a brain fart based on my idea. the only thing was I wasn’t entirely happy with the concept vs how they turned out, that’s why I ended up selling them on. No doubt a new and improved version of the Draxxion will emerge at some point, there are a few other ideas brewing that will come first!

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The Brood leader turned out pretty good, I always liked that one, the other overseer guard was ok too. They’re also pretty big beasts compared to the 15mm-ish forces they were percieved to face. You could say that these would make good 25-28mm troops as well depending. The Draxx were always designed to be big buggers, as you would imagine being dragons at various stages of age and growth (so, thats how I’ll use them, but I’ll get into that later…)

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Onto the smaller brood, we’ve got the scout (well, that’s my take on it) it’s still big if you compare it to 15mm stuff, but he’s a step down from the elites. He’s got a studious look to him, definite leader material, or advisor in some shape or form.

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Next up is the next size down, some kind of heavy, quite a oriental feel to him (the head at least) he’ll make a fine leader for a heavy weapons detachment I’m planning.

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Last, are the smaller 15mm-ish brood warriors. A load of these would be great, filling in the gaps of the battle force (which I don’t have, but I do have some additions of my own for my wargaming purposes!)

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As with a lot of the figures I sculpt, there are plenty of uses for these, in scales from 15mm, 20mm and more, it’s up to you! You’ll have to forgive my paintwork and my pics, with lighting being bad, it’s tricky to get the desired effect I want, plus I don’t know where my glasses are, so it makes it even harder to see (but, I’ll soldier on.)

Like I’ve mentioned, I’ll be making a Draxx warband using these, and some other stuff I have around, and these will make a good start as the command section. I’ll post the progress soon.

I hope that these figures are useful to some of you, it gives me a buzz to know that other people might collect, paint and game with any of the stuff I create from random brainfarts, and indeed any ideas my head spawns, and remember I appreciate any constructive comments pertaining to anything raised here.

I’ll be back later with more miniature and wargaming dooings (It’s about time I brought it back in line) once I have sorted a few bits and caught up with webby stuff.

ciao!

 

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