Tag Archives: terrain tutorial

Grim’s Dungeons of Doom: Realm of the Dead; Necropolis Obelisk

9 Aug

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Ok, so finally I found the photos for this episode of Grim’s Dungeons of Doom; Realm of the dead. This article, we are going to make some Necropolis Obelisks or tomb marker type monuments, these will match the rest of the other dungeon set and work well as standalone pieces in their own right. As ever, you can catch up with other articles in  this series by clicking on the link in the menu, to see how the set is put together. I’ll be detailing two different designs here, but the idea is simple so it’s just to illustrate how you can make up your own designs with little real effort. Anyway, lets get going and build something… Continue reading

Grim’s Dungeons of Doom: Realm of the dead; Opening Cemetery Gates.

18 Jun

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It’s Saturday, and that means it’s yet another post for Grim’s Dungeons of Doom, that being of the advanced (but still quite easy) version of the cemetery gateway, actual opening gates. I have tried to use alternatives methods and materials to give you some different ideas that you can take away and adapt for your own builds on a variety of model projects.  Continue reading

Grim’s Dungeons of Doom: Realm of the dead; Cemetery Gateway

11 Jun

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Hello everyone, it’s me Grim. In my absence, I at least have been amassing a fair bit of material here to continue on with both this series and the blog. I hope you’ll forgive my leave, but shit happens.

So, it’s been a while since posting the last dungeons of doom article. With that in mind, I present to you a series of new load of themed tutorials that deal with the realm of the dead. Over time we’ll be concentrating on a different theme at a time, focusing first with the graveyard/cemetery starting with this creepy skull encrusted cemetery gateway… Continue reading

Grim’s Dungeons of Doom: Tavern Tales: Raising the bar! Making a Tavern bar!

29 Nov

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Well, here I am again, with a later than  scheduled terrain making post, I know it’s been a while, but haven’t had much chance to do much with a PC for what seems like ages.

So, while not fitting the whole dungeon theme entirely, we kick off this belated Grim’s Dungeons of Doom article with a set piece that is ever present in stock fantasy games, The Tavern bar. This’ll be first in a series detailing how to turn your modular dungeon scenics into more than just an underground lair, and lets you turn the system into a viable way to simulate entire buildings and interiors. These new pieces need no more skills or techniques other than what I’ve already shown you, and we’ll refer to other articles in the series for the “how to’s” to specific parts of the build.

Continue reading

Terrain Workshop: Ruined Houses (part 2)

8 Jul

Following on from the last post, in this part, I’m going to show you how to create a really easy, companion set of ruins using a few waste materials that one might have on hand. From this:

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To this:

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Lets get started.

The foundation of this model is balsa wood, taken from a horse wooden model left over bits. I bought it for my daughter, and she was kind enough to let me have the leftover wood. If your a regular to poundshops and the like, most have them or something similar. Here’s the model used, just so if you want to do the same (Any of the cheap wood model sprues should do):

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After you’ve made the model, you’ll be left with some wooden sprue that held all the parts, to be honest, its pretty scrappy poor quality wood, but since we’re making ruins, it will be more than adequate for our needs. As you’ll see, the kits are actually punch printed sheets/boards, and have perfect (ish) 90 degree angles at each corner. These corners are the starting point and you’ll need four of them (2 for each ruined corner) Choose the best looking ones, ones that look as if you have some form of window or door opening if possible as it will save you time if you don’t have as much work to do on them if they look like what you need. Sure you can hack it up as you see fit, but this way you don’t have to.

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Since the wood is soft, you can get a biro or stylus/pencil and begin to make textures on the surfaces of each side. You can push down into the wood to provide detail to the plain walls, adding brick and slats that you can drybrush and highlight later.

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As you can see, you don’t need to be neat or to pecise, nor do you need to measure (unless you really want to), You’ll need two complete corners, so do another set in the exact same way.

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Stick the corners down to your thick card base (or what ever base your using) and leave to dry. After that, its time to start building up your layers of debris. you can use the rest of the wood sprue for this, just break it up into useful looking shapes, blocks and planks with a strong pair of snips, knife or scissors, and slowly layer it up to form natural looking piles, maybe where a ceiling or internal wall has fell down, its really up to you how you want to do it. Remember to leave some areas for your miniatures to hide in the model during play.

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The next stage of the build, I wanted a bit more detail to what could essentially be quite a boring model, so I got a dried stem from a bunch of grapes (I always keep these and dry them out as they are very strong, as well as being a dead ringer for blasted or dead foliage) Using milliput to create the base of the tree, I added it to one corner, as well as a bit at the side. More putty was added for additional bits, and more layers of debris were glued on along the edges.

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Now, I’d like to mention back to our freebie craft material, artificial grass, which if you remember I used to produce the field in a previous article. This stuff is a really useful and versatile material for making terrain, this time I was going to use it to add wild tufts to the model.

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As you can see, you can easily cut it up into strips due to it being stitched on to the rubber base, then each turf can be cut to whatever size you desire. These are then glued down using impact adhesive to the model.

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All that is needed now is an undercoat and finishing in the same manner as the other ruins so they will match up.

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To finish up with the model, a mix of the usual green and grey and brown flocks, plus grey ballast and a little static grass brings more life into the piece.

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You can see all the ruined buildings from both posts, fit together great, best of all they cost nowt (Just the cost of glue, flock, paint, milliput etc) I hope that it inspires you to create some post apoc battlescapes for your own projects, and hopefully will save you a few dollars or pounds in the process!

I’ll be putting more projects up soon, which I’m planning more ambitious builds, not that I have anything against fields or ruins, they are just a little basic and I feel the need to do something a bit more challenging!!

As ever your thoughts, questions and comments are welcome!

Peace out….

 

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